PDA

View Full Version : Recipes for Pernese Food


tommie08
18th August 2005, 03:29 PM
I don't know if anybody's started a thread about this yet, but if they have, I haven't seen it. I would like to have some Pernese Recipes for myself for when I get bored and have nothing else to do, so I go to my kitchen to cook. I asked for some recipes on the old KTBB, but my dad got a new computer, so all my those were thrown away on that old hard drive. I never thought to write then down, so I've decided to ask you guys on here for some of them, and this time they will be written down, and kept in a safe place in my room (like on my Pern shelf of my new book shelf). Anybody want to help?

Bronze-Dragonrider
19th August 2005, 01:26 AM
Well, these are mostly just slightly adapted earth recipes, but these are what the DLG has:

Hearty Herdbeast Stew
For tastiest results, use either the meat of a mature bovine or young ovine. If using boving, the meat can be either raw or roasted rare to meduim rare. To serve four, assemble the following ingredients:

1 to 1 1/2 pounds herdbeast, cut into 1 inch pieces
3 tablespoons flour
3 tablespoons butter or margerine
1 garlic clove (if desired)
1/2 large onion, cut into bite sized pieces
1 pound peeled tomatoes, (or 1 16-ounce can of tomatoes in their own juice)
2 cups water
4 small or 2 medium sized potatoes, peeled
2-4 small carrots, sliced
2 ribs celery, sliced into 1-inch pieces
bay leaf
1 cup corn kernels or baby corn cut into 1-inch pieces, drained
salt
pepper
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard or cracked mustard seeds
garlic salt
parsley

Dredge the pieces of meat in flour. Melt the butter in a sauce-pan. When bubbly, add the meat. Brown the pieces on all sides. Sprinkle salt and pepper. Add the onion and garlic; cook until transparent. Add the tomatoes and 2 cups of water. Break up the tomatoes with a spoon. Add potatoes, bay leaf, carrots and celery. Bring the misture to a boil, cover, reduce to a simmer, and let cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add corn, spices to taste. Bring the stew to a boil again, cover, and return to a simmer. Cook for 15-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until corn, potatoes, and meat are all tender. Uncover and cook for 15 or so minutes until stew is slightly thickened.


An Earth equivalent to Klah

Mix together:

2 tablespoons sweet ground chocolate
1/2 cup dark cocoa
3/8 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon dark instant coffee crystals, ground to powder
small pinch of nutmeg

Use two to four teaspoons of the mixture per cup of boiling water. Stir well. The klah should be thick, much like hot cocoa.

However, the way I like to make it, I just put cinnamon, vanilla and nutmeg into a coffee filter and stir in hot chocolate powder after the coffee is made.


Benden Baklava

12 ounces melted clarified butter or fat
4 ounces oil
32 ounces pulverized Benden nuts powdered bark spice (optional)
40 leaves of flour-and-water dough stretched to paper thinness
12 ounces granulated sweetening
1/4 ounce strained citrus juice
6 ounces water
1/4 ounce sweet syrup

Mix butter and oil. Cut dough to shape of the baking pan by laying the pan ontop of stacked leaves. Butter the inside of the baking dish. Gently place one leaf of dough into the pan, fitting carefully along the bottom of the pan. The leaves are very fragile. so fold to pick them up, and unfold when in place in the pan. Brush with butter-and-oil mixture. Repeat with 9 more sheets. Sprinkle 3 tablespoons of powdered nuts (with optional spice to taste) on tenth leaf. Open two more leaves of dough on top of nut mixture, buttering each in turn. Repeat with the nut mixture and two more leaves until all are used up. As soon as the last two leaves are used, brush the top with butter and oil.

With a very sharp knife, score the top of the pastry lightly legthwise into four, and then draw the knife diagonally to make lozenge-shaped portions. bake in a 325 degree oven for 90 minutes.

Combine the next three ingredients in a saucepan. Cook until the sweetening dissolves. Boil for five minutes, or until a drop of it forms a soft ball when dropped into cold water. Remove from heat; stir in syrup. Cool. As soon as the pastry is baked, remove from oven and pour the sweet misture over it. Cool the pastry to room temperature. Serve.


Bubbly Pies

Crust:
1/2 cup cup butter or margerine
2 tablespoons granulated sweetening
2 1/2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup ice water

Cut the butter into chunks. Combine the dry ingredients into a bowl. Work the butter gently into the dry mixture with a fork until pieces thesize of peas form. Sprinkle the water over and work in. (do not overwork the dough) Form the dough into a ball.

Filling:
5 cups blueberries (or one 20-ounce package, frozen)
1 cup granulated sweetening
1/4 teaspoon powdered klah bark (cinnamon)
2 teaspoon citrus juice
1-2 tablespoons butter or margerine

Tently toss berries with sweetening and klah bark in a large bowl. Sprinkle citrus juice over mixture. Spoon berries into crust and dot with butter.

For Six Tarts:
1 crust recipe
1 filling recipe

Divide the ball into two pieces. Work with one at a time. Form each into a ball and press out into a circle. Divide each circle into six. Roll each piece into a ball. Flatten to 1/8 of an inch, cut into 5-inch circles, and fit six into the tart pans. Fill with berry mixture. Moisten the edge of each tart and top with second circle of dough. Seal and flute the edges. Cut slits in the top of each tart with a knife. Cover edge of each tart with foil.

Bake at 375 degrees for ten minutes. Remove foil. bake for 8-12 minutes more, or until crust is golden. Serve hot.

For Twelve Gather Pies:
1 crust recipe
1 beaten egg
1/2 filling recipe

Roll out dough on a floured surface to a 1/8-inch thickness. Using a 3-inch cookie cutter, cut out 24 circles. Lay out 12 on a greased cookie sheet. Divide filling among circles, spooning approximately 2-3 tablespoons into the center of each, leaving a 1/4-inch border.

Brush the border with egg. Lay the second circle on top of each pie, and press edges together with a fork all the way around. (Stretch the top crust gently to fit if necessary.) If desired, mix together 1/4 cup water with 1 1/2 tablespoons sweetening; brush top of each pie with mixture for a sugary glaze. With a knife, cut 3 or 4 short slits in the top of each pie.

Bake at 400 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until crust is golden. Slide gently off cookie sheet with spatula. Serve hot.

TamTam
19th August 2005, 06:15 AM
(snip)
32 ounces pulverized Benden nuts powdered bark spice (optional)

It better be optional, considering we don't have Benden nuts. Does the DLG give an alternative to Benden nuts? (Sorry, don't have a DLG. :shrug:)

Bronze-Dragonrider
19th August 2005, 06:24 AM
Hmmm, I don't see anything else... most sorts of nuts, maybe almonds, should be easily used as an alternative.

Mausey
19th August 2005, 05:59 PM
You'll find that everybody has a favorite variation on klah. :D


An Earth equivalent to Klah

Mix together:

2 tablespoons sweet ground chocolate (I use grated easter bunnies :D )
1/2 cup dark cocoa
3/8 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon dark instant coffee crystals, ground to powder
small pinch of nutmeg

Use two to four teaspoons of the mixture per cup of boiling water. Stir well. The klah should be thick, much like hot cocoa.

I make a large container of this for my one son every christmas. When I make it, I put sugar in the mix so all he has to do is add the hot water.

Anareth
22nd August 2005, 04:29 AM
Baklava, when it has nuts, is usually made with pistachios. Use whatever nuts you want. Tree bark spice, meanwhile, sounds like cinnamon, which is a bark (that's two different ingredients in the DLG--the cinnamon is to taste.)

By the way, "ounces" in proper recipes means by weight, not by volume. Except for the liquids. Those are by fluid ounces, usually. (Sometimes you measure liquids in baking by weight. Has anyone actually USED this recipe? You might be better off going to a real cookbook that's more clear. It's just baklava, so any Greek cookbook or something like Better Homes should have one.) Oh, and if anyone doesn't know, use filo dough (that's what 'flour and water' dough is), not puff paste. If I have free time and nothing better to do, maybe I'll test this recipe. I really don't like baklava, but I can always give it to downstairs.

Brenda
22nd August 2005, 06:37 PM
For meatrolls - make pizza dough, knead it a lot so it'll be tough and travel well, then wrap it around chunks of leftover meat like roast beef or sausages. The point is that this is the Granola Bar of Pern - quick, filling, keeps you going, goes anywhere, travels well.

Mausey
22nd August 2005, 06:49 PM
For meatrolls - make pizza dough, knead it a lot so it'll be tough and travel well, then wrap it around chunks of leftover meat like roast beef or sausages. The point is that this is the Granola Bar of Pern - quick, filling, keeps you going, goes anywhere, travels well.

Another recipe where everybody has a favored variation. :laugh: I use biscuit (for the non north americans, sort of a scone) dough and wrap it around cooked pork sausages and bake until nice and brown. Like Brenda's recipe, they travel well and don't flake very much.

Brenda
23rd August 2005, 02:11 PM
I thought the point of biscuits was that they are very flaky? I guess just like with mine, if you knead it extra then it will be tougher... I haven't made biscuits much, and haven't tried tinkering with the recipe yet.

Raisha
23rd August 2005, 07:00 PM
I think the idea was that flakey food items don't travel well, because they leave a mess on everything else. If meat rolls are the ultimate finger food on the go, then they probably wouldn't be something that was messy.

Of course, as a vegetarian, I always wondered if Pern has vegetarian alternatives or other dishes. Most of the food mentioned in the books seems awfully British/Western European (no surprise considering the source), but I always imagined that with the number of cultures that were represented in the original colonists, there would be a lot more variety in Pernese cuisine. And Asian food in particular seems to have a lot of vegetarian-friendly recipes, so why not Pernese equivalents? Something besides the endless herdbeast and tubers, please!

Bronze-Dragonrider
23rd August 2005, 07:34 PM
I think the idea was that flakey food items don't travel well, because they leave a mess on everything else. If meat rolls are the ultimate finger food on the go, then they probably wouldn't be something that was messy.
:laugh: I was just about to post the same thing!

But the suggestion of being wrapped in a pizza-like dough sounds very good, as it isn't all that flakey. It's easy enough to make, and would be fairly stable.

Anareth
23rd August 2005, 07:46 PM
It's highly unlikely that people in a subsistence culture with no religion would develop vegetarians. Most of the Eastern/Asian veg dishes come from cultures rooted in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, which have religious bases for not eating animals, and most Western vegetarians are either veg for religious or health/taste preference reasons or for dubious moral feelings about animals. The Pernese lead a lifestyle where health from food is a limited issue, and they can't afford to be sentimental about animals and their feewings. They also can't afford to be picky eaters--when you've got Thread limiting your crop-growing, lots of work to be done, and limited access to food, you eat what's put in front of you and don't get fussy about it. Where there is no religious motivation (and Pern has no religions) vegetarianism is a byproduct of a leisure culture, where people have time to fuss over animals, sentiment, and where their lifestyle makes diet a concern.

Also, there's the reality that if you don't have artifically altered grain products (and maybe they do--we have to do it in processing now, but maybe in the future they'll engineer it in) like premade cereals with added B12, you have to at least eat dairy, eggs, or fish or eventually you'll die. The only natural source for that vitamin is animal protein. If you don't have it, eventually the reserves in your body are depleted, and your nervous system breaks down.

You could probably develop a realistically Pernese pesco-veg or ovo-lacto menu, but the Pernese wouldn't have vegans. I would think you could fill a 'meat roll' with a seafood or vegetable base. We did a summer roll (like a spring roll, only steamed) with shrimp and chinese cabbage that was rather good in Nutrition. "Spider-claw" rolls? They have to have vegetables, so you should be able to do something with them. Though the Pernese themselves would likely never be vegan or consciously vegetarian.

Mausey
24th August 2005, 07:00 PM
*snip* I think the idea was that flakey food items don't travel well, because they leave a mess on everything else. If meat rolls are the ultimate finger food on the go, then they probably wouldn't be something that was messy. *snip*


When you roll the dough out quite thin it toughens it up so it doesn't flake. And I do roll it very thin so when it rises (usually doubles in thickness) it doesn't make too much bread and too little meat.

There might be some vegetarian dishes for main courses but I think Anareth is right, most people today choose not to eat meat due to a religious preference.

Raisha
24th August 2005, 09:43 PM
I didn't mean to start an off-topic argument on whether or not vegetarian lifestyles were possible on Pern, or if people were likely to pursue them. I merely meant to point out that while traditional Western European cuisine seems to rely heavily on meat in their dishes, this wasn't the case in all cultures. Many people enjoy meat-free meals whether or not they choose to eat meat at least some of the time. I know many people who are not strict vegetarians, but prefer a wider variety of foods in their diet and therefore choose not to eat meat more than once or twice a week. Yet in discussions about Pernese food, all I hear are herdbeast this and meat rolls that. It may sound realistic if Pern were a carbon copy duplicate of medieval Europe (as some people treat it), but I think Pernese cuisine should be more diverse. This has nothing to do with religion or morals; it's a matter of taste.

I'm sorry if people misinterpreted my original post, but I don't want to start an argument about why people may or may not choose to not eat meat. This isn't really the place for that.

Bronze-Dragonrider
24th August 2005, 11:38 PM
No worries, it wasn't TOO off topic, it was still about food ;) and anyway, a thread is entitled to go a little off track now and then :D After leah's Sig: Threads that stay on topic die a quick death :laugh:

Anareth
24th August 2005, 11:43 PM
I think the big problem is the recipes given in the DLG are herdbeast stew and desserts, so people don't have a lot to go on. And of course EVERY FREAKIN PERSON in the books apparently lives off meat rolls and bubbly pies. (I hope there is a LOT of fiber in those berries, because if not, well...ahem.) Personally, I'd like to know what they have in the way of grain crops--it seems likely they'd bring something like quinoa and amaranth, as they're one of the only ways to get all the essential amino acids from a plant source (even if amaranth smells funny and has a very strange texture when cooked. Quinoa makes a good casserole, though.) And they HAVE to have plants besides tubers, fingerroots, and river grains.

Raisha
25th August 2005, 08:15 AM
Yeah, I know vegetarianism is related to food and it was a logical topic-drift, but personally I find that a lot of discussions on vegetarianism just turn into unpleasant arguments quickly, and I already get into that enough on other forums. Maybe someday I'll put in the effort and research to try and construct a logical argument about if vegetarian lifestyles could exist on Pern without the religion, but I don't really have the energy for that right now. ;)

The DLG does mention a little bit more about what the colonists brought with them and what native plants they discovered were edible when they arrived, and using the DLG and numerous book references, a fan has composed a wonderful list called All the Plants of Pern (http://www.angelfire.com/on2/menai/pernplants.html). Combine that with the variety of animals on Pern, and you can convert a ton of Earth recipes to Pernese cuisine. My fiance, who has a degree in culinary arts, has been using that site for reinventing cajun cooking on my Pern RPG -- I'll see if I can pester some recipes out of him.

Bronze-Dragonrider
25th August 2005, 10:19 AM
a fan has composed a wonderful list called All the Plants of Pern (http://www.angelfire.com/on2/menai/pernplants.html).
That was a very interesting read, thanks for posting it! :ok:

Brenda
25th August 2005, 03:56 PM
Thinking about the Hatching feast at the end of Dragonsong:
roast wherry, roast herdbeast
fish stew
steamed river grains (rice?)
breads, spiced cakes
tubers (Menolly peeled a mountain of them!)
white roots - sliced thinly and baked - probably turnips, since they're not distinguished as tubers
redroots - probably beets
There would probably have been various fruits, probably fresh greens if there had been time to gather any - there might be a garden of things like lettuce and spinach at the Weyr, since those wouldn't travel well as a tithe.
And of course, wine and klah!

Seems pretty balanced to me.

TamTam
25th August 2005, 09:37 PM
(snip)
white roots - sliced thinly and baked - probably turnips, since they're not distinguished as tubers

Could be turnips. Could also be parsnips. :shrug:

It really bugs me when the names of foods are changed in the books. Pet peeve.

Brenda
26th August 2005, 05:07 PM
It might even have been a native vegetable. I don't know anything about parsnips, though!

dragondreams87
30th August 2005, 05:18 PM
I have seen a couple of sites that have started a Pernese cook book. Ican't recall the sites at the moment but i have seen them..besides the ones that are listed from DLG

Vyon
27th September 2005, 12:55 PM
More on food, and vegetarianism. Most of the meals described in the novels are feast-meals when they would kill the fatted herdbeast, or equivalent. For everyday eating the invisible poor and ordinary classes would probably mostly eat cereals, tubers, and pulses.

I was with a bunch of unobservant vegetarians at a permaculture farm not so long ago when one of them asked the farmer if he was a vegetarian. His answer, no, vegetarianism was a luxury. What would we do with bull-calves, roosters and the like?

Unobservant because it was almost impossible to move without tripping over a hen, duck, or guinea-fowl. It was ages since I'd seen guinea-fowls. I'm sure they weren't just kept for scratching up the compost!

Kelwyss
6th October 2005, 05:05 AM
It really bugs me when the names of foods are changed in the books. Pet peeve.

Hi, :wave: New in town... I actually like it when things are changed around a bit. The basic idea is still there, but it's fun to imagine just exactly what they might be eating. It's a whole different world, so why would things be the same as earthly veggies and the like? :bouncy: